LG’s 48-inch OLED TV is a high-end home theater display and gaming monitor rolled into one

  • LG’s CX is our top OLED TV pick due to its attractive show and forward-looking options.
  • The 48-inch model makes probably the most of OLED tech and may function a lounge TV or gaming monitor.
  • A brand new 2021 C1 OLED is ready for launch this yr, however we expect the CX will stay a greater worth.

Prices pulled from the Amazon Product Advertising API on:

Product prices and availability are accurate as of the date/time indicated and are subject to change. Any price and availability information displayed on [relevant Amazon Site(s), as applicable] at the time of purchase will apply to the purchase of this product.

The LG CX is our decision for the best OLED TV you should buy, combining the sharp, vivid colors and infinite distinction ratio of OLED show know-how with LG’s quickest TV processor.

The 48-inch evaluation unit we acquired is the smallest OLED TV in the marketplace, with costs beginning at $1,500 and dipping to $1,200 throughout gross sales. LG’s CX can also be accessible in 55-, 65-, and 77-inch fashions, with base retail pricing going as much as $5,000 ($3,500 on sale) for the biggest dimension.

While the LG CX OLED is more expensive than many 4K LED TVs of the same size, the difference in picture quality is immediately obvious thanks to the self-illuminating pixels on the OLED panel. Because each pixel on an OLED display can be separately lighted, black areas of the screen will remain pitch black during dark scenes, avoiding the foggy grey “halo” look seen on back-lit LED televisions. High dynamic range (HDR) formats like HDR10 and Dolby Vision, which have become the new standard for streaming shows and video games, benefit from the infinite contrast ratio.

The LG CX has a reputation for being a great gaming monitor in addition to being our top-rated OLED TV. The LG CX has a native 120Hz refresh rate and HDMI 2.1 connections, allowing PCs and next-generation consoles like the PlayStation 5 and Xbox Series X to run at a higher frame rate. When opposed to earlier TV models that are limited to 60Hz, this results in smoother-looking gaming. The LG CX, with sizes starting at 48 inches, takes up a lot more room than a regular monitor.

After more than two months of daily viewing on the LG CX, I can confidently declare that this OLED TV is the greatest choice for most families, whether you’re looking for a family TV, a home theater display, or a personal gaming setup. If you can afford the premium price tag, the LG CX OLED will leave you completely satisfied.

LG CX OLED TV specs

LG's 48-inch OLED TV is a high-end home theater display and gaming monitor rolled into one
Amazon
LG 48-inch CX OLED 4K TVSpecs
Display48-inch OLED panel
Dimensions with stand42.2 x 25.6 x 9.9 inches
Weight with stand41.7 kilos (32.eight kilos with out stand)
Decision4K Extremely HD 3,840 x 2,160 
Refresh fee120Hz with assist for VRR, Nvidia G-sync, and AMD FreeSync
HDR CodecsHDR10, Dolby Imaginative and prescient, HLG, HGiG
Ports4x HDMI 2.1 ports, 3x USB 2. Zero ports, 1x AV enter
Audio2.2ch audio system, 40W with 20W woofer
ConnectivityEthernet, Wi-Fi, Apple AirPlay2, Bluetooth 5.0
Good TV platformLG webOS
DistantLG magic distant with voice controls
Digital AssistantsAmazon Alexa and Google Assistant appropriate

Setup and design

LG CX OLED side view
The LG CX OLED panel is razor skinny. LG

While the LG CX is tiny enough to be carried by one person, you’ll need a second pair of hands to unpack the 33-pound screen and put it on the stand’s wide base. You can use the provided screws to fix the base, or you can use a VESA wall mount.

The LG CX has a distinct design that is more akin to a sleek smartphone display than a boxed in TV screen thanks to the razor thin bezel around the outside of the OLED panel. When watching letterbox movies, the OLED screen’s striking blacks stand out even more since the black bars create a distinct border pushing against the screen’s boundaries.

Despite its slimness, the LG CX’s base is wider than other of LG’s cheaper LED models, which have little plastic feet on the left and right of the screen. A cable management compartment is located on the back of the LG CX base, making it easier to hide any wires that need to be run to the TV.

The majority of the LG CX’s inputs are located on the left side of the TV, a few inches behind the screen. Three HDMI ports and two USB ports are on the front of the TV, with the remaining connectors on the back. Power and a fast menu of on-screen controls are provided by a single button situated beneath the screen.

Performance in the film

For several years, LG has been producing industry-leading OLED displays, and the LG CX offers near-perfect image quality. Along with a great display, the LG CX boasts the newest hardware to get the most out of 4K devices, as well as licensed technology like Dolby Vision and Nvidia G-Sync to improve picture quality even more.

Four HDMI 2.1 connectors are included in the TV, which can carry data at a far faster pace than HDMI 2.0 ports. This allows 4K streaming devices to display the finest possible picture quality while also allowing for higher refresh rates on consoles and PCs.

Once set up, LG’s CX OLED panel requires little to no calibration, though this may be personal preference. The basic picture option, which is popular on most consumer TVs, is somewhat brightened and includes some post-processing, while the cinema mode removes those effects for a more neutral picture that should reflect the source more precisely. When HDR content is viewed, LG’s CX will identify it and switch to HDR-specific presets, though regular, movie, and game modes will still be available.

According to CNET, the peak brightness of the 48-inch LG CX is around 600 nits, while the larger variants may reach up to 700. Although that brightness level is lower than other LED TVs, the OLED display’s infinite blacks give higher contrast and a more enjoyable viewing experience when watching HDR content.

To test the LG CX’s contrast and general picture quality, I utilized classics like “The Lord of the Rings” and the notoriously dark “The Long Night” episode of “Game of Thrones,” both with and without HDR. On all counts, the results are stunning: darkish scenes that were difficult to see on my previous LG LED TV are now visible in excellent clarity, and the precise illumination prevents dark dungeons and castles from being washed out. Similarly, bright scenes retain their fine details without the use of an LED backlight to illuminate extra areas of the screen.

The LG CX also does an outstanding job of upscaling lower resolution signals, smoothing out the ragged edges of my 480p Nintendo Wii at 60Hz and the variable picture quality from my 1080i cable box.

When you use a PlayStation or Xbox console, the TV automatically switches to “Instant Game Response” mode, which disables most post-processing, increases brightness, and decreases input delay to make your controls as responsive as possible. If you typically use your LG CX for gaming, you’ll want to enable HGiG for the HDMI port on your console to achieve the best HDR picture quality.

I utilized fast-paced, visually demanding video games like “Tetris Effect” and “Dragon Ball FighterZ” to test the CX for issues like artifacting and ghosting, but the screen remained incredibly responsive regardless of whether I was playing at 60Hz on the Wii and Switch or 120Hz on my PC and PS5.

Gaming options

LG's 48-inch OLED TV is a high-end home theater display and gaming monitor rolled into one
LG

The LG CX is incredibly snappy for a television, with input delay comparable to that of many high-end gaming monitors and a better native resolution.

Many of the new capabilities enabled by the PlayStation 5 and Xbox Series X, such as variable refresh rate and 120 frames per second gaming, are only available on HDMI 2.1 compliant TVs like the LG CX.

The PS5’s RGB color display, for example, takes too much bandwidth to utilize at 4K resolution with an HDMI 2.0 connector, thus it falls back to YUV422, a significantly downgraded format. Similarly, if you want to play at 4K resolution and 120Hz refresh rate, you’ll need an HDMI 2.1 port; otherwise, you’ll only be able to play at 1440p and 120Hz on HDMI 2.0.

While many TVs only have one HDMI 2.1 port, the LG CX features four, allowing you to connect numerous high-bandwidth 4K devices.

The LG CX also offers a variable refresh rate and licensed technologies from Nvidia and AMD, two of the biggest computer graphics hardware firms. Nvidia G-Sync and AMD FreeSync help match the refresh rate of the display to the speed of the video game being played. This is especially beneficial for PC gamers because it reduces screen tearing and smooths animation.

I had no issues setting up my RTX 2060 PC with the LG CX using G-Sync and HDR. Variable refresh rate could be activated on both my Xbox One S and Xbox One X thanks to AMD FreeSync compatibility.

Good TV options

LG's 48-inch OLED TV is a high-end home theater display and gaming monitor rolled into one
Amazon

LG’s webOS smart TV platform is one of the best in the industry, with capabilities including streaming apps, screen sharing, and voice control. When compared to cheaper webOS TVs, the LG CX’s a9 CPU makes navigating the UI quick and easy, with little stuttering between actions.

You may order your most used menu items and apps, eliminate the ones you don’t need, and rename all of your inputs using the home screen and settings interface. During setup, WebOS also looked up my local TV listings, offering far faster navigation and scheduling information than my set-top cable box.

Netflix, YouTube, Vudu, Amazon Prime Video, Disney Plus, Hulu, Peacock, Apple TV Plus, and even music streaming apps like Spotify and Pandora are all supported by WebOS. When apps that support 4K HDR and Dolby Vision are downloaded from LG’s content store, they should automatically use those formats. However, some capabilities, such as Dolby Atmos through Disney Plus, may not always work because companies occasionally limit support based on the platform being used.

HBO Max is obviously absent from webOS, though you can screen share with the LG CX by casting the HBO Max app from another mobile device. Because the CX supports both Android casting and Apple’s AirPlay 2, it can screen share with most mobile devices. You may also sideload your saved movies, music, and images via a USB drive, or stream them straight from a shared media folder on another PC on your network.

The LG content store has a lot of games and other entertainment apps to pick from, but just a few of them appear to be worth your time. LG Channels, a collection of over 100 free streaming “IP channels,” is also available on the CX. Rather than operating as standard broadcast or cable TV stations, these are channels specialized to a specific subject. They are a free service that just requires an internet connection.

For voice commands, the CX works with both Google Assistant and Amazon’s Alexa; webOS voice queries will be answered by Google Assistant. Because of the exact phrases necessary and the speed required to process commands, I found LG’s Alexa skill to be burdensome; it was often faster to just grab the remote, unless I was already well out of range of the TV.

The LG magic distant

LG Magic Remote
LG

To be honest, I underestimated the influence the magic remote would have on my time with the LG CX, but thanks to the TV’s rapid processing, the mouse-style control feels like a huge game changer.

LG’s Magic Remote Control features a motion-controlled cursor, a scroll wheel, and voice control, and due to webOS, it’s simple to integrate with most set-top boxes and video game consoles. Although there is a universal remote setup process for more specific devices, the LG CX enabled the magic remote to work effortlessly with my Amazon Fire Stick, PlayStation, and Xbox consoles with no configuration necessary.

When requested, the remote’s voice control is simple to use and generally accurate, whether it’s used with specific apps or webOS.

Do you have to fear about burn-in on an OLED TV?

Burn-in is a problem with OLED displays that has been known to occur. Burn-in occurs when a static image is displayed for an extended period of time, causing the pixels on the screen to age at various rates. This can leave a faint “ghost” picture on the screen while you’re watching. With this in mind, OLED TV manufacturers have developed burn-in prevention technologies.

Burn-in and image retention are addressed by three features on the LG CX. You can use “clear panel noise” to restore the color of the TV’s pixels; you can use screen shift to adjust the pixels at regular intervals to keep a static image from becoming stuck; or you can use logo luminance adjustment to dim the brightness of static logos such as sports scoreboards or news tickers.

If you’re curious, websites like Rtings have done long-term experiments with OLED burn-in, and while burn-in can happen, these tests demonstrate that most consumers won’t have to worry about it.

After more than two months of using the LG CX as a TV or a PC monitor, I haven’t observed any image retention or burn-in concerns. I mostly used the LG CX for PC gaming, but I didn’t notice any negative affects from using it as my primary work monitor for two days.

Should you purchase it?

The LG CX OLED is an excellent pick if you’re looking for a new TV and have more than $1,000 to invest. The OLED’s fast processing and features, in addition to the best-in-class display, should fulfill all of your entertainment needs for years to ahead.

The 48-inch model may be too small for some living rooms, so test your normal viewing distance before choosing the right size; LG also has 55-, 65-, and 77-inch variants. In fact, the 55-inch model is currently cheaper than the 48-inch model, meaning you’re paying a premium for the extra convenience of a smaller screen.

LG’s CX is also suitable for gamers looking to get the most out of next-generation hardware such as the PlayStation 5, Xbox Series X, and Nvidia 3000 series graphics cards. The LG CX is more expensive than most premium gaming monitors, but the OLED’s faultless HDR color support and HDMI 2.1’s improved refresh rates help it exceed just about every display on the market, and its smart TV capabilities add even more value.

What are your alternate options?

The 48-inch LG CX is among the most inexpensive OLED TVs in the marketplace, on the smallest, sobtainsained stable worth for consumers who desire a high-end TV underneath 50 inches. In actual fact, it is the one OLED TV at present accessible at that display screen dimension.

Neverthelifhould you’re open to a bigger 55-inch TV, you-consider count the LG BX OLED, which decrease drdecreaseeak brightness than the CX and a smaller; stand, however, is around $200 cheaper.

Vizio’s 55-inch OLED can also be a worthwhile contender for consumers on a price range. It is $300 cheaper than the 48-inch LG CX, however our evaluate discovered that it has some points with glitches and HDMI 2.1 compatibility. Most of those points have been corrected by a firmware replace, nevertheless.

The Sony A8H OLED could have even higher image accuracy than the LG CX based mostly on our reviewer’s expertise, however followers of video games and top quality HDR codecs could also be dissatisfied by its complete lack of HDMI 2.1 ports.

It is also price noting that LG might be releasing its new C1 48-inch OLED later this yr, however pricing hasn’t been introduced. The 2021 mannequin is the successor to the CX, and it presents improved processing. Exterior of processing, nevertheless, the C1 TV’s specs are practically similar to the CX, so the CX stays our prime suggestion. 

The underside line

LG CX Assassin's Creed
LG CX options like variable refresh fee and HGiG will make video games like “Murderer’s Creed: Valhalla” look even higher. LG

LG’s CX OLED is a fantastic TV that combines the best of OLED display technology, a user-friendly interface, and cutting-edge hardware. The LG CX is one of the greatest TVs and gaming monitors available, thanks to its exact picture clarity and experience-enhancing features like variable refresh rate. The 48-inch model is an excellent starting point for anyone looking to purchase their first OLED display.

There are a few more options if you need a larger screen, but you can’t go wrong with the LG CX in any size.

Pros: Infinite contrast ratio, four HDMI 2.1 connections, excellent gaming capabilities, support for Google Assistant and Alexa, magic remote, native refresh rate of 120Hz

Cons: The peak brightness is lower than that of LED competition, and there is no HBO Max app.

Prices pulled from the Amazon Product Advertising API on:

Product prices and availability are accurate as of the date/time indicated and are subject to change. Any price and availability information displayed on [relevant Amazon Site(s), as applicable] at the time of purchase will apply to the purchase of this product.


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